Together, we can end viral hepatitis.

We are the only grant-making organization dedicated exclusively to the mission of ending viral hepatitis.

By funding a variety of the most effective activities, EndHep2030 intends to overcome the barriers that prevent countries from properly addressing viral hepatitis — a pandemic that will kill 1.4 million people this year — as a global public health threat.

EndHep2030’s catalytic funding will be the spark that sets this historic effort in motion. MORE

In the News

08.08.2019

Pakistan announces a new ambitious plan to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030

On World Hepatitis Day, the Government of Pakistan announced a new ambitious plan by the Prime Minister to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030. The plan was unveiled by Dr Zafar Mirza, Special Assistant to the Prime Minister, and aims to scale up hepatitis prevention, testing and treatment services by screening up to 140 million people in Pakistan for viral hepatitis and providing free medical treatment for those infected. Approximately, 15 million people are living with hepatitis B and C in Pakistan and more than 20,000 people die annually of hepatitis-related causes.

New initiatives were also announced for injection safety, safe blood transfusion and national infection control guidelines. The Government of Pakistan has also been able to procure hepatitis C treatment at low prices. Providing treatment to all those currently diagnosed with hepatitis C could reduce healthcare costs in Pakistan within three years. It is estimated that 16 million people in Pakistan will need antivirals.

Pakistan’s President Alvi noted, “The plan is a step forward toward improving healthcare in the country and achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals in the long run.”

2030

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More than 10% of Mongolia’s three million people are living with chronic hepatitis infection. The chances of a mother with viral hepatitis giving birth to an infected baby who develops life-long infection can be as high as 85%.

Fortunately, though heavily burdened by the disease, Mongolia has become a champion in the fight against it. In the first year of its Healthy Liver Program, more than 350,000 people were tested, and over 70% of those diagnosed with hepatitis were provided with treatment that is life-saving and prevents infection to others.

The means to prevent and cure the disease exist now. All we need is the will — and commitment — to make it happen.

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